How to Become a U.S. Marshal (Deputy)

According to usmarshals.gov, the USMS (United States Marshals Service) is the oldest of the federal law enforcement agencies in the United States and served the country since 1789.

The USMS acts as the law enforcement of the judiciary department.

There are 94 district offices, one for each of the federal judicial districts.

There are also 218 sub-offices and 3 foreign offices.

A US Marshal manages each of the district offices and receives his job through appointment by the President.

Each of the other investigators and law enforcement agents who work in the office are called deputy US marshals.

US Marshal Responsibilities

Marshals have the responsibility of conducting fugitive investigations, operating the witness protection program, transporting federal prisoners, and protecting the federal judiciary.

The USMS is also in charge of seizing, managing, selling, and distributing assets that belong to convicted felons.

A U.S. Marshal will help transport federal prisoners to different judicial districts.

This may include flying across the nation or to another country with a prisoner to ensure that they arrive safely and that all other passengers are safe while the prisoner is transported.

U.S. Marshals also help with fugitive operations.

This includes working with task forces in order to help make arrests.

The USMS will work with the law enforcement agency by providing assistance, training, and expertise on how to handle these issues.

The USMS also houses more than 63,000 detainees in local, state, federal, and private jails across the nation.

In order to house these prisoners the USMS rents jail space from state and local governments.

Becoming a Deputy United States Marshal

In order to become a deputy United States marshal a person must take and pass the written test.

In addition, a personal interview will be conducted and a person must do well during this.

us marshall

U.S Marshal

Practice your interview skills with friends and family members, telling them why you want this particular position.

Other requirements for the position include:

  • Must be a citizen of the United States
  • Must be between 21 and 36 years old
  • Must be in great physical condition
  • Must have a bachelor’s degree or three years of experience. College credits and experience may be combined to meet this requirement.
  • Have a valid driver’s license and a clean driving record
  • Allow a background investigation

In addition, before becoming a deputy United States Marshal a person has to go through basic training at the FLETC Academy that is located in Glynco, Georgia.

It is important to be in excellent physical condition in order to be a U.S. Marshal. Eat well, exercise, and do not take illegal drugs or smoke.

Education

A four-year degree is required to apply for this position.

It is recommended that a person obtain a graduate level of study in a field such as criminal justice or law enforcement.

For someone that is interested in becoming a U.S. Marshal, maintaining a high GPA, of 3.0 or higher, is recommended to increase the chances of obtaining employment in this field.

Ranking in the top third of your graduating class is beneficial as well.

Salary Information by State

State Employed Avg. Annual Salary Avg. Hourly Pay Top 10% Annual Salary Bottom 10% Annual Salary
Alabama12,570$48,820$23.47$66,660$31,650
Alaska1,310$85,710$41.21$122,790$43,060
Arizona11,850$69,900$33.61$82,360$50,660
Arkansas5,200$42,000$20.19$62,260$28,970
California70,090$104,010$50.01$134,010$65,890
Colorado10,140$80,990$38.94$99,740$57,920
Connecticut6,410$77,280$37.16$95,190$56,830
Delaware1,860$77,490$37.26$100,730$55,590
District of Columbia5,280$81,160$39.02$102,500$62,440
Florida47,000$73,350$35.26$101,480$45,970
Georgia21,140$49,520$23.81$63,260$36,170
Hawaii2,360$89,640$43.09$109,580$67,490
Idaho3,160$59,640$28.67$80,190$44,610
Illinois29,290$82,470$39.65$101,430$49,010
Indiana12,470$62,190$29.90$76,450$46,190
Iowa5,090$65,120$31.31$85,530$46,940
Kansas5,920$51,990$25.00$77,240$35,510
Kentucky6,460$48,170$23.16$63,660$34,820
Louisiana13,080$45,310$21.78$59,520$29,080
Maine2,080$56,960$27.39$72,180$43,350
Maryland10,280$73,350$35.27$94,060$52,340
Massachusetts17,450$73,290$35.23$98,020$48,700
Michigan16,350$63,450$30.50$80,660$44,500
Minnesota9,020$76,420$36.74$98,530$50,420
Mississippi7,520$38,430$18.48$51,310$25,360
Missouri12,300$54,490$26.20$78,620$35,690
Montana1,940$61,250$29.45$76,370$45,540
Nebraska3,320$64,720$31.11$82,230$46,910
Nevada5,620$74,060$35.60$92,780$58,160
New Hampshire2,900$62,480$30.04$80,120$47,480
New Jersey20,510$90,520$43.52$128,360$51,110
New Mexico4,610$56,690$27.26$71,910$40,550
New York50,600$81,750$39.30$127,020$49,210
North Carolina20,480$51,310$24.67$70,240$37,230
North Dakota1,710$65,730$31.60$79,960$48,550
Ohio24,150$68,300$32.84$93,090$40,590
Oklahoma8,900$54,020$25.97$80,340$30,650
Oregon4,880$78,150$37.57$94,330$60,740
Pennsylvania25,210$75,260$36.18$103,400$44,820
Rhode Island1,760$68,290$32.83$83,200$49,080
South Carolina11,640$49,490$23.79$65,250$36,250
South Dakota1,830$54,130$26.02$76,390$39,270
Tennessee12,650$50,020$24.05$66,470$35,830
Texas59,290$66,570$32.00$89,980$45,560
Utah5,200$62,790$30.19$78,940$47,010
Vermont870$61,810$29.72$76,610$47,130
Virginia17,190$60,420$29.05$80,970$44,240
Washington8,960$92,250$44.35$117,420$66,090
West Virginia3,190$48,310$23.23$59,520$37,070
Wisconsin11,530$69,050$33.20$83,820$48,760
Wyoming1,230$57,070$27.44$69,030$44,530
Puerto Rico12,930$40,230$19.34$49,570$23,430

Annual Average Salary: Top 10 States

The top earning state in the field is California, where the average salary is $104,010.

These are the top 10 earning states in the field:

  • California - $104,010
  • Washington - $92,250
  • New Jersey - $90,520
  • Hawaii - $89,640
  • Alaska - $85,710
  • Illinois - $82,470
  • New York - $81,750
  • District of Columbia - $81,160
  • Colorado - $80,990
  • Oregon - $78,150
* Salary information based on the May 2022 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey for Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers, OCC Code 33-3051, BLS.
* Employment conditions in your area may vary.

Career Opportunities

With the US Marshal Service being the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the United States, Deputy US Marshals should continue to be key components of the federal justice system for the foreseeable future.

The US Marshals service conducts hiring as staffing needs arise and also depending on government funding.

To find any available opportunities check the employment page of the U.S. Marshals at http://www.usmarshals.gov/careers/deputy_positions.html

Michael Morales

About Michael Morales

Michael Morales is the Webmaster and Editor in Chief for Legalcareerpaths.com. With a strong background in Web Publishing and Internet Marketing, he currently works as an independent consultant. A former paramedic and ems educator, he enjoys punishing himself doing triathlons and endurance sports. Michael currently lives in sunny Northern California, home of the highest tax rates in the world.

4 Responses to How to Become a U.S. Marshal (Deputy)

  1. Avatar
    Santino Reyes #

    It’s important to note that the role can be physically and mentally demanding, requiring dedication, adaptability, and the ability to handle high-stress situation.

  2. Avatar
    Vanessa Begley #

    The training and skills acquired as a US Marshal are invaluable, and the camaraderie among colleagues fosters a sense of unity and purpose.

  3. Avatar
    Richard Gramling #

    One of the rewarding aspects of this career is the opportunity to work on high-profile cases and make a significant impact on public safety.

  4. Avatar
    Gregg Stone #

    It is an incredible career choice, as it involves upholding the law, ensuring justice, and protecting the safety of our communities.

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