Probation Officer

A probation officer has the responsibility of supervising the activities of individuals who have been convicted of crimes and released on probation.

A probation officer is very similar to a parole officer in that both types of law enforcement deal with convicts, but probation officers primarily deal with convicts of lesser crimes who have not been recently discharged from state or federal prison.

Probation officers work with local, state, and federal prison systems.

When a convict is released from state or federal prison, in most cases they are discharged from physical custody but may remain in the custody of the state by way of parole for a period of time.

Learn more about how to be a parole officer.

The job of a probation officer includes helping these individuals find treatment options, gain employment, and track the individual’s overall progress when they are released from prison.

Probation officers will document their findings and hold meetings with other individuals responsible for the case to discuss different options that may be available.

Ultimately, the job of a probation officer is to serve as a mentor and supervisor for offenders who are trying to rejoin society.

How to be a probation officer

Minimum Qualifications

One of the skills that a person must have in order to be successful in this career is communication ability.

This job requires a person to communicate not only with the offender, but also with the offender’s friends and family, the judge who is overseeing the case, and treatment specialists, all on a regular basis.

Training and Education

The minimum education required for probation officers is a bachelor’s degree in a human service-related field.

The best degree to obtain if you are interested in becoming a probation officer is either in social work or in criminal justice.

Other options include sociology, criminology, or psychology.

Individuals who are currently employed and would like to study for this may find several online degree programs available that can be completed from their homes.

The exact requirements for training will vary based on the state and the employer.

Typically, most places will require an individual to have some type of law enforcement training before they apply for a probation officer job.

One of the ways to gain experience is to serve as a police officer or corrections officer, or in a law enforcement position that is similar to these.

Those individuals who are still students may want to consider an internship in the field of social work or counseling.

These internships are great for improving skills that are necessary for the position.

After completing a degree and applying for a job, a person will likely have to attend a training program for their state in order to become employed as a probation officer.

Each state has different requirements that must be met to work in these positions.

Become a Probation Officer

Salary & Career Outlook

Before being hired, most applicants for a probation officer position should expect to go through an extensive interview process as well as a thorough background check.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the field has 86,810 active employees with an average yearly salary for probation officers in the United States at $52,910 (2013).

The top ten percent in these positions earn an average of $84,160 and the bottom ten percent earn an average of $32,010 per year.

The exact salary a person earns in this field will depend on their location, the employer, and the person’s education and experience.

Salaries tend to go up the longer a person works in the field.

Salary Information by State

State Employed Avg. Annual Salary Avg. Hourly Pay Top 10% Annual Salary Bottom 10% Annual Salary
Alabama1,010$50,470$24.26$67,000$36,310
Arizona2,110$58,340$28.05$79,100$39,560
Arkansas920$45,940$22.09$56,390$37,400
California14,670$97,300$46.78$133,680$61,480
Colorado2,180$65,170$31.33$89,480$49,900
Connecticut1,080$91,690$44.08$110,910$66,000
Delaware370$54,360$26.14$64,410$45,000
Florida4,030$44,300$21.30$58,220$32,280
Georgia2,480$44,830$21.55$58,000$32,910
Hawaii40$67,130$32.27$82,940$47,960
Idaho650$49,490$23.79$59,830$39,300
Illinois2,740$66,450$31.95$94,410$46,940
Indiana1,990$54,710$26.30$76,640$36,730
Iowa950$72,330$34.77$90,160$50,120
Kansas650$47,230$22.71$58,500$37,980
Kentucky790$41,050$19.74$49,670$34,800
Louisiana870$54,870$26.38$73,550$38,480
Maine170$57,860$27.82$63,190$47,470
Maryland1,310$64,200$30.87$79,310$47,590
Massachusetts1,170$83,370$40.08$101,430$47,420
Michigan2,260$65,720$31.60$73,240$48,840
Minnesota1,720$74,630$35.88$95,460$48,510
Mississippi430$38,180$18.35$45,140$28,680
Missouri2,420$42,190$20.29$50,120$34,220
Montana360$48,160$23.15$61,270$36,290
Nebraska710$52,600$25.29$61,230$39,470
Nevada870$65,000$31.25$79,810$47,010
New Hampshire190$66,300$31.88$78,350$50,460
New Jersey2,800$77,670$37.34$97,830$48,370
New Mexico590$49,450$23.77$59,160$42,220
New York5,130$81,370$39.12$103,050$58,910
North Carolina3,300$45,190$21.73$55,640$35,780
North Dakota210$63,340$30.45$81,390$49,800
Ohio2,720$57,580$27.68$78,470$39,100
Oklahoma910$45,860$22.05$58,540$36,730
Oregon1,960$69,720$33.52$92,100$47,090
Pennsylvania4,220$61,850$29.74$84,540$39,690
South Carolina350$49,770$23.93$65,150$41,000
South Dakota330$52,840$25.41$62,110$44,700
Tennessee2,300$47,310$22.75$59,490$37,450
Texas7,090$49,540$23.82$63,540$37,360
Utah790$57,700$27.74$69,200$43,490
Vermont180$70,200$33.75$83,430$57,320
Virginia3,050$49,510$23.80$63,520$37,020
Washington2,010$69,960$33.64$94,270$54,520
West Virginia810$46,900$22.55$61,050$33,100
Wisconsin1,340$52,530$25.25$63,190$42,390
Wyoming160$52,030$25.02$62,780$46,860

Annual Average Salary: Top 10 States

The top earning state in the field is California, where the average salary is $97,300.

These are the top 10 earning states in the field:

  • California - $97,300
  • Connecticut - $91,690
  • Massachusetts - $83,370
  • New York - $81,370
  • New Jersey - $77,670
  • Minnesota - $74,630
  • Iowa - $72,330
  • Vermont - $70,200
  • Washington - $69,960
  • Oregon - $69,720
* Salary information based on the May 2022 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey for Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists, OCC Code 21-1092, BLS.
* Employment conditions in your area may vary.

Michael Morales

About Michael Morales

Michael Morales is the Webmaster and Editor in Chief for Legalcareerpaths.com. With a strong background in Web Publishing and Internet Marketing, he currently works as an independent consultant. A former paramedic and ems educator, he enjoys punishing himself doing triathlons and endurance sports. Michael currently lives in sunny Northern California, home of the highest tax rates in the world.

2 Responses to Probation Officer

  1. Avatar
    Christopher Carlton #

    It offers a unique opportunity to see positive transformation in people’s lives which is a great experience too because you are able to help them with your job.

  2. Avatar
    Claudia Ross #

    Thy often work behind the scenes, but their work is a bit crucial in reducing recidivism and making our communities safer and more supportive.

Leave a Reply

Search Programs